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International Journal of Population Research
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 274305, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/274305
Research Article

The Brain Drain Potential of Students in the African Health and Nonhealth Sectors

1Balsillie School of International Affairs, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 6C2
2University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa

Received 8 November 2011; Revised 31 January 2012; Accepted 28 February 2012

Academic Editor: Pranitha Maharaj

Copyright © 2012 Jonathan Crush and Wade Pendleton. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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