Table 4: Marginal effects on the probability of working full-time, part-time and choosing to retire, sample of full-time workers 2001–2005, by age and gender (Percentage points difference in estimated probability).

Age 50–59Age 60–69
MaleFemaleMaleFemale

Earnings ($10,000 increase)Full-time1.79***4.55***2.58***8.52***
Part-time−1.61***−4.32***−2.01***−7.79***
Retirement−0.18***−0.23***−0.57***−0.73***

Lifetime earnings ($10,000 increase)Full-time0.010.07−0.16−0.38
Part-time−0.01−0.060.130.35
Retirement0−0.010.030.03

Wealth ($10,000 increase)Full-time−0.05***0.01−0.22***−0.08
Part-time0.04***−0.010.17***0.07
Retirement0.01***−0.000.05***0.01

One-year accrual ($10,000 increase)Full-time0.04−0.17−0.090.26
Part-time−0.030.160.07−0.23
Retirement−0.010.010.02−0.03

Health shockFull-time−1.73−10.27**−10.54***−13.68***
Part-time1.649.51**7.74***12.86***
Retirement0.190.75**2.80***0.82***

ImmigrantFull-time0.893.38***4.05*3.86
Part-time−0.80−3.22***−3.19*−3.55
Retirement−0.09−0.16***−0.86*−0.31

Working spouseFull-time3.08***0.056.53***3.66
Part-time−2.76***−0.05−5.06***−3.35
Retirement−0.32***0.00−1.49***−0.31

Dependent childrenFull-time1.33***0.59−1.0813.06*
Part-time−1.12***−0.560.83−12.27*
Retirement−0.21***−0.030.25−0.79*

Other control variables (education level and year dummies) are included in ordered probit regressions. Marginal effects are significant at 99% (***), 95% (**), and 90% (*), not significant otherwise.