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International Journal of Proteomics
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 479571, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/479571
Review Article

Heat Shock Proteins in the Human Eye

Department of Ophthalmology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Hobrovej 18-22, 9100 Aalborg, Denmark

Received 1 July 2010; Revised 11 November 2010; Accepted 17 December 2010

Academic Editor: Jen-Fu Chiu

Copyright © 2010 Lærke Urbak and Henrik Vorum. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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