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International Journal of Proteomics
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 373816, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/373816
Review Article

Phosphorylation: The Molecular Switch of Double-Strand Break Repair

Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA

Received 15 December 2010; Revised 9 February 2011; Accepted 19 March 2011

Academic Editor: Yaoqi Zhou

Copyright © 2011 K. C. Summers et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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