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International Journal of Proteomics
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 529648, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/529648
Review Article

Heat Shock Proteins in Association with Heat Tolerance in Grasses

1Department of Plant Biology and Pathology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
2Department of Biology, Ramapo College of New Jersey, NJ 07430, USA
3Department of Biochemistry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA

Received 19 October 2010; Accepted 14 January 2011

Academic Editor: S. Komatsu

Copyright © 2011 Yan Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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