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International Journal of Surgical Oncology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 154673, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/154673
Review Article

Hereditary Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Cancers

1Department of Surgery, Saint Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, MD 21229, USA
2Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA

Received 4 April 2011; Accepted 28 April 2011

Academic Editor: Benedito Mauro Rossi

Copyright © 2011 Ashraf Haddad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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