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International Journal of Surgical Oncology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 374012, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/374012
Review Article

Clinical Considerations of BRCA1- and BRCA2-Mutation Carriers: A Review

1The Department of Obstetrics, Gynaecology, and Newborn Care, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6
2Centre for Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6
3The Division of Gynaecologic Oncology, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6

Received 2 April 2011; Accepted 16 June 2011

Academic Editor: Bernardo Garicochea

Copyright © 2011 O. Bougie and J. I. Weberpals. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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