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International Journal of Surgical Oncology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 127854, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/127854
Research Article

Survival Implications Associated with Variation in Mastectomy Rates for Early-Staged Breast Cancer

1College of Pharmacy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
2College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
3Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
4Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapell Hill, NC 27599, USA
5Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02115, USA
6Division of General Internal Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02120, USA

Received 23 March 2012; Revised 23 May 2012; Accepted 25 June 2012

Academic Editor: Steven Heys

Copyright © 2012 John M. Brooks et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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