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International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 917826, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/917826
Research Article

Managing Requirement Volatility in an Ontology-Driven Clinical LIMS Using Category Theory

Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Boulevard West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3G 1M8

Received 17 June 2008; Revised 30 October 2008; Accepted 29 December 2008

Academic Editor: Hui Chen

Copyright © 2009 Arash Shaban-Nejad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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