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International Journal of Zoology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 362976, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/362976
Review Article

A Review and Interspecific Comparison of Nocturnal and Cathemeral Strepsirhine Primate Olfactory Behavioural Ecology

Department of Anthropology and The Centre for Environment and Sustainability, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada N6A 5C2

Received 13 November 2010; Revised 2 February 2011; Accepted 17 March 2011

Academic Editor: Lesley Rogers

Copyright © 2011 Ian C. Colquhoun. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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