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International Journal of Zoology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 373197, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/373197
Review Article

Interactions between Temperament, Stress, and Immune Function in Cattle

1Livestock Issues Research Unit, USDA, ARS, Lubbock, TX 79403, USA
2Texas AgriLife Research, Texas A&M System, Overton, TX 75684, USA
3Texas AgriLife Research, Texas A&M System, College Station, TX 77843, USA

Received 19 January 2011; Accepted 10 March 2011

Academic Editor: Frank Seebacher

Copyright © 2011 N. C. Burdick et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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