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International Journal of Zoology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 149026, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/149026
Research Article

Identifying Large- and Small-Scale Habitat Characteristics of Monarch Butterfly Migratory Roost Sites with Citizen Science Observations

1Odum School of Ecology, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
2D.B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
3Journey North, 1321 Bragg Hill Road, Norwich, VT 05055, USA

Received 29 January 2012; Revised 15 March 2012; Accepted 20 March 2012

Academic Editor: Anne Goodenough

Copyright © 2012 Andrew K. Davis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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