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International Journal of Zoology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 428752, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/428752
Research Article

An Evaluation of Ad Hoc Presence-Only Data in Explaining Patterns of Distribution: Cetacean Sightings from Whale-Watching Vessels

1School of Ocean Sciences, Bangor University, Menai Bridge, Anglesey LL59 5AB, UK
2School of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Faculty of Life and Enviromental Sciences, Elding Whale-Watching, Ægisgata 7, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland
3Division of Science, Institute of Biomedical and Environmental Science and Technology, University of Bedfordshire, Luton LU1 3JU, UK
4School of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Faculty of Life and Enviromental Sciences, University of Iceland, Sturlugata 7, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland

Received 1 March 2012; Accepted 10 April 2012

Academic Editor: Anne Goodenough

Copyright © 2012 Louisa K. Higby et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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