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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2008 (2008), Article ID 839501, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2008/839501
Review Article

Application of Ecological Network Theory to the Human Microbiome

1Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-3051, USA
2The Initiative for Bioinformatics and Evolutionary STudies (IBEST), University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-3051, USA
3Department of Mathematics, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-3051, USA

Received 31 May 2008; Accepted 18 August 2008

Academic Editor: Thomas M. Schmidt

Copyright © 2008 James A. Foster et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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