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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 238743, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/238743
Research Article

Contact Heterogeneity and Phylodynamics: How Contact Networks Shape Parasite Evolutionary Trees

1Section of Integrative Biology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
2Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
3Institute for Cellular and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA

Received 4 June 2010; Accepted 15 October 2010

Academic Editor: Katia Koelle

Copyright © 2011 Eamon B. O'Dea and Claus O. Wilke. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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