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Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Infectious Diseases
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 741406, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/741406
Commentary

It Takes a Community to Raise the Prevalence of a Zoonotic Pathogen

1Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Leidy Laboratories 209, 433 South University Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018, USA
2Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Arizona, BioSciences West room 310, 1041 E. Lowell St., Tucson, AZ, USA
3Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Box AB, Millbrook, NY 12545, USA

Received 28 January 2011; Revised 18 July 2011; Accepted 7 September 2011

Copyright © 2011 Dustin Brisson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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