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RETRACTED
This article has been retracted as it is essentially identical in title and technical content with the published article “Idempotent Elements of the Endomorphism Semiring of a Finite Chain,” by Ivan Trendafilov and Dimitrinka Vladeva, published in Comptes Rendus de L'Académie Bulgare des Sciences 66 (2013), no. 5, 621-628.
ISRN Algebra
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 120231, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/120231
Research Article

Idempotent Elements of the Endomorphism Semiring of a Finite Chain

1Department of Algebra and Geometry, Faculty of Applied Mathematics and Informatics, Technical University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria
2Department of Mathematics and Physics, University of Forestry, Sofia, Bulgaria

Received 30 November 2012; Accepted 19 December 2012

Academic Editors: S. Dascalescu, A. Vourdas, and M. Walton

Copyright © 2013 Ivan Trendafilov and Dimitrinka Vladeva. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Idempotents yield much insight in the structure of finite semigroups and semirings. In this article, we obtain some results on (multiplicatively) idempotents of the endomorphism semiring of a finite chain. We prove that the set of all idempotents with certain fixed points is a semiring and find its order. We further show that this semiring is an ideal in a well-known semiring. The construction of an equivalence relation such that any equivalence class contains just one idempotent is proposed. In our main result we prove that such an equivalence class is a semiring and find its order. We prove that the set of all idempotents with certain jump points is a semiring.

1. Introduction

The idempotents play an essential role in the theory of finite semigroups and semirings. It is well known that in a finite semigroup some power of each element is an idempotent, so the idempotents can be taken to be like a generating system of the semigroup or the semiring. For deep results, using idempotents in the representation theory of finite semigroups, we refer the reader to [1, 2].

Let us briefly survey the contents of our paper. After the preliminaries, in Section 3 we show some facts about the fixed points of idempotent endomorphisms. The central result here is Theorem 9 where we prove that the set of all idempotents with fixed points , , is a semiring of order . Moreover, this semiring is an ideal of the semiring of all endomorphisms having at least as fixed points. In the next section we consider an equivalence relation on some finite semigroup such that for any follows if and only if , where and is an idempotent of . Then we consider the equivalence classes of semigroup which is, see [3], one subsemigroup of . Here we investigate the so-called jump points of the endomorphism and prove that between any two fixed points and of an endomorphism, where , there is a unique jump point.

The main result of the paper is Theorem 19 where we prove that such an equivalence class is a semiring of order where is the th Catalan number.

In the last section of the paper we consider idempotent endomorphisms with arbitrary fixed points but with certain jump points. Here we prove that the set of idempotent endomorphisms with identical jump points is a semiring.

2. Preliminaries

We consider some basic definitions and facts concerning finite semigroups and that can be found in any of [1, 2, 4, 5]. As the terminology for semirings is not completely standardized, we say what our conventions are.

An algebra with two binary operations + and    on is called a semiring if(i) is a commutative semigroup,(ii) is a semigroup,(iii) both distributive laws hold and for any .

Let be a semiring. If a neutral element of semigroup exists and it satisfies for all , then it is called zero. If a neutral element of semigroup exists, it is called identity element.

For a semilattice the set of the endomorphisms of is a semiring with respect to the addition and multiplication defined by(i)   when    for  all  ,(ii)  when    for  all  .

This semiring is called the endomorphism semiring of . In this paper all semilattices are finite chains. Following [6, 7], we fix a finite chain and denote the endomorphism semiring of this chain with . We do not assume that for arbitrary . So, there is not a zero in endomorphism semiring . Subsemiring of consisting of all endomorphisms with property has zero and is considered in [68].

If such that for any we denote as an ordered -tuple . Note that mappings will be composed accordingly, although we will usually give preference to writing mappings on the right, so that means “first , then .” The identity and all constant endomorphisms are obviously (multiplicatively) idempotents.

An element satisfying is called a fixed point of the endomorphism . Any has at most fixed points, and only identity has just fixed points.

For other properties of the endomorphism semiring we refer the reader to [3, 68].

In the following sections we use some terms from [4] having in mind that in [3] we show that some subsemigroups of the partial transformation semigroup are indeed endomorphism semirings.

3. Idempotent Endomorphisms and Their Fixed Points

The set of all idempotents (or idempotent elements) of semiring is not a semiring namely; endomorphisms and are the idempotents of semiring but is not an idempotent. The following several facts are well known or are consequences of well-known facts.

Proposition 1. The endomorphism is an idempotent if and only if for any , which is not a fixed point of , image is a fixed point of .

Note that in [9] maps are considered such that for all , where is not necessarily a finite semilattice. These maps are called constant endomorphisms.

For any with one fixed point the cardinality of set is an arbitrary number from 2 to . Indeed, for with unique fixed point we have and for with the same unique fixed point, . So, the following consequence of Proposition 1 is important.

Corollary 2. An endomorphism with only one fixed point is an idempotent if and only if it is a constant.

More generally follows Corollary 3.

Corollary 3. An endomorphism with fixed points , , is an idempotent if and only if .

Let have just fixed points. Then and . So, and from Corollary 3 follows.

Corollary 4. Every endomorphism with fixed points is an idempotent.

Let have just fixed points. Let and , where . If we assume that and are not consecutive, then or . Similarly, or . Since , , , and are fixed points, from Proposition 1 it follows that is an idempotent. Let us assume that . If (1), (2), (3),

then it easily follows that is an idempotent. Let us assume that and . Then from Proposition 1 it follows that is not an idempotent endomorphism. But it is clear that and .

Thus we prove the following.

Corollary 5. Every endomorphism with fixed points is either an idempotent or .

By similar reasonings, we may prove the following more general fact.

Corollary 6. Let have fixed points , where and all other two points and , , are not consecutive; that is , , where , and . Then is an idempotent.

Let have just two fixed points and , where . From Corollary 3 it follows that where images , , are equal either to or to .

Thus the endomorphisms of such type are For these maps we have Hence , where . It is easy to see that for all . So, we prove the following.

Proposition 7. The set of idempotent endomorphisms with two fixed points and , , is a semiring of order  .

Example 8. The idempotent endomorphisms of semiring   with fixed points 1 and 5 are The semiring consisting of these maps has the following addition and multiplication tables:

Theorem 9. The subset of ,  , of all idempotent endomorphisms with fixed points , , is a semiring of order .

Proof. Let be the least fixed point of idempotent endomorphism . If , then . We assume that . Then is a contradiction to the minimal choice of . Hence , that is in the first positions of the ordered -tuple which represent endomorphism occurs only .
Let be the biggest fixed point of idempotent endomorphism . If , then . We assume that .
Now follows which is a contradiction to the maximal choice of . Hence , that is the last positions of the ordered -tuple which represent endomorphism occurs only .
We denote by , where , the number of coordinates in the ordered -tuple which represents endomorphism equal to . For it follows
So every idempotent endomorphism with fixed points has the following type:
Let another endomorphism have the same type:
Since , where , it follows that has the type of and .
For these and it follows that . (So, the multiplication of idempotent endomorphisms with fixed points   is like the multiplication of constant endomorphisms—every idempotent is a right identity).
Thus we prove that the set of all idempotent endomorphisms with fixed points , , is a semiring.
From the inequalities of numbers , where , it follows that all possibilities to have   in  -tuple are .
The order of this semiring is equal to the product of all possibilities for the fixed points , where . This number is equal to product , and the proof is completed.

The semiring of the idempotent endomorphisms of with fixed points is denoted by . Since the semiring of all the endomorphisms with fixed points is , it follows that is a subsemiring of .

Remark 10. (a) From Theorem 9 semiring has two elements: idempotent endomorphisms and . This semiring has the following addition and multiplication tables:
(b) The product of endomorphisms from different semirings is not, in general, an idempotent. Indeed, in semiring for it follows that , but this endomorphism is not an idempotent.
(c) The sum of two idempotent endomorphisms such that the fixed points of the first one are part of the fixed points of another endomorphism is not surely an idempotent. For instance, .

Corollary 11. Let and , where . Semiring is an ideal of .

Proof. Using Theorem 9, it will be enough to show that is closed under the left and right multiplications by elements of .
Let Hence .
Now we calculate
Since , where , then , and from the proof of Theorem 9 it follows that .
Since , it follows that
But endomorphism maps all the elements between and either in , or in . Then are either , or . We use such arguments for the next elements of which are between the other fixed points. Thus

4. Roots of Idempotent Endomorphisms

Let be a finite semigroup. It is well known, see [10], that for any there is a positive integer such that is an idempotent element of .

Now we consider the following relation: for any we define where is an idempotent element of .

Obviously, the relation is reflexive and symmetric.

Let and . Then and where and are idempotents. Now it follows that and ; thus . Hence ; that is, . So, we prove that is an equivalence relation on .

Note that two different idempotents belong to different equivalence classes modulo . If is an idempotent, the elements of the equivalence class containing are called roots of idempotent .

The following natural question arises: are there any finite noncommutative semigroups such that the equivalence classes (modulo the previous relation) are semigroups?

Of course, we must avoid trivial examples of commutative semigroups, nilpotent semigroups, and others.

To answer the previous question, we consider the semigroup and the already defined equivalence relation.

Let . Element is called a jump point of if , and one of the following conditions holds:(1) and ,(2) and .

There are endomorphisms without jump points, namely, identity and constant endomorphisms , . For , endomorphism has no jump points if . The endomorphisms and , see Remark 10, have jump points: and are jump points of and , respectively.

Theorem 12. Let , , be an endomorphism with fixed points , . Let for some , , fixed points and be non consecutive; that is, . Then there is a unique jump point of such that .

Proof. For there are two possibilities:(1), then is the searched jump point of , or(2).
Let for any . If , then is the searched jump point of .
We assume that for all . Now . But , so, is the searched jump point of .
Suppose that and are two jump points of such that and . Let . Now . Let , and is the maximal element such that . Then , and it follows that which is a contradiction. By the same arguments we show that is impossible. So is the unique jump point of such that .

Let be the least fixed point of endomorphism and , . If we suppose that , using , it follows that for some maximal element , where , we have and then , which is impossible. So, for every it follows that . Similarly for every , where is the biggest fixed point of , it follows that . So, we prove the following.

Corollary 13. Every endomorphism , , with just fixed points , which are not consecutive, that is, for , has just jump points such that .

Remark 14. From Theorem 9 it follows that the number of idempotents with fixed points is a semiring of order . But if two fixed points and are consecutive, the difference is equal to 1, and they do not appear in the product. So, the order of the semiring is equal to , where are (after suitable renumbering) non consecutive fixed points. But for any the difference is just the number of possible jump points , where . So, for given fixed points the order of semiring of idempotents is equal to the number of all -tuples , where for and . Hence, any -tuple defines just one idempotent from the semiring considered.
To describe precisely all the fixed points of an arbitrary endomorphism we will use new indices. Let first fixed point of be and let some fixed points after be consecutive; that is, are fixed points such that where . Let the next fixed point be such that . So we construct the first pair of two fixed points which are not consecutive. Let the following fixed points be such that where . The next fixed point is and . Let the last pair of two non consecutive fixed points be and . Then the last fixed points are such that where . So, we construct a partition of a set of fixed points of such that we can distinguish the fixed points which are not consecutive.
Let be the jump points of such that , where and .
An endomorphism with fixed points and jump points from the previous definitions is called a endomorphism of type
Let us consider endomorphism of this type such that(i) for any ,(ii) for any , where ,(iii) for any , where ,(iv) for any .

Now it is easy to show that this endomorphism is an idempotent.

Let be another idempotent of the same type. Then from the reasonings just before Corollary 13 it follows that(i) for any , (ii) for any .

Since is an idempotent, we conclude that for some , where , it follows either , or . By using that    is of type (18) it follows that for all , where and . Hence, there is only one idempotent of the given type (18). This endomorphism is

Lemma 15. Let be an idempotent endomorphism. If is a root of , then both endomorphisms and have the same fixed points.

Proof. Let be a fixed point of . If , then , and by the same arguments for arbitrary natural number , but this is a contradiction to for some . Analogously, assuming that , we obtain a contradiction to equality . Hence .
Let be a fixed point of . Since it is a fixed point of for arbitrary natural , it follows that it is a fixed point of .

Lemma 16. Let be an idempotent endomorphism. If is a root of , then both endomorphisms and have the same jump points.

Proof. Let be a jump point of and , . If we assume that , then for arbitrary natural which is a contradiction to for some .
Analogously, if we assume that it follows that for arbitrary natural which is also a contradiction. Hence is a jump point of such that and . From similar reasonings, it follows that if is a jump point of such that and for every endomorphism , which is a root of , we have that is a jump point of , , and .
Let be a jump point of such that and . Then for arbitrary natural it follows and . So, is a jump point of , and . Analogously, and imply and for every natural number , so is a jump point of , and .

Immediately from Lemmas 15 and 16 follows Proposition 17.

Proposition 17. All the endomorphisms of one equivalence class modulo are of the same type.

Let the idempotent endomorphism from (19) be an element of equivalence class . Then is called an equivalence class of type (18).

Lemma 18. Let be an equivalence class of type (18). Then any satisfies the following conditions:(A), where , , , , or ;(B), where , , , , or .   

Proof. We assume that for some such that it follows that . Then and by induction for arbitrary natural . It is a contradiction to the assumption that for some natural , where has the form (19). Thus we prove that .
Analogously, we assume that for some such that it follows . Then by induction for arbitrary natural . This contradicts the assumption that for some natural , where has the form (19). Thus we prove that .

Note that if two endomorphisms have the same fixed points but different jump points, their product can posses a new fixed point. For instance, endomorphisms and have fixed points 2 and 5 but and have new fixed points 3 and 4, respectively.

Let us remind that the jump points, which we use in (18), are defined by equality . So it follows that . Now we denote . The indices and will be used in the next theorem.

Theorem 19. Every equivalence class modulo of type (18) is a subsemiring of , . The order of this semiring is where is the th Catalan number.

Proof. Let be an equivalence class of type (18) and . Using Lemma 18 it follows that(A) and , where , , , or . Then and .(B) and , where , , , or , or . Then and .

Thus we prove that equivalence class is a subsemiring of .

For the second part of the proof of the theorem we needed two combinatorial lemmas.

Lemma 20. The number of the ordered -tuples , where (1) for ,(2) for ,(3) for ,

is the th Catalan number .

The proof of this lemma is a part of the proof of Proposition 3.4 of [7]. This result (using the so-called Dyck paths) and many other applications of Catalan numbers can be found in [11].

Lemma 21. The number of the ordered -tuples , where (1) for , ,(2) for ,(3) for

is the th Catalan number .

Proof of Lemma 21. Let be the ordered -tuple. Since for any , follows that ; that is, . Instead of the -tuple we consider the -tuple , where , . Then and . From Lemma 20 it follows that the number of all -tuples of this kind is .
Now we continue the proof of the theorem.
For all the intervals considered in part (A) (from the beginning of this proof) we apply Lemma 21. Then, for all the intervals considered in part (B) we apply Lemma 20. Hence we find that the number of the endomorphisms in the equivalence class modulo of type is .

Remark 22. The equivalence relation is not a congruence on . For we consider the endomorphisms Now we compute and . So, it follows that , but .

5. The Crucial Role of Jump Points

Here we consider the idempotent endomorphisms with arbitrary fixed points but we assume that each endomorphism has for jump points.

Two jump points and of the idempotent are called consecutive if . First, let us answer the question: are there any consecutive jump points of the idempotent endomorphism?

Yes, for instance, is an idempotent and jump points and are consecutive. Note that is also a fixed point of . So, we modify the question: If the first jump point is not a fixed point, is it possible fort the next point to be a jump point?

The answer is negative. Indeed, if is an idempotent and , then from Proposition 1 it follows that , and, since , we have . So, is not a jump point of .

Lemma 23. Let be an idempotent and and let be non consecutive jump points of . Then in interval one of the following holds:(1) is a constant endomorphism.(2) is an identity.(3) is an identity in interval and a constant endomorphism in interval .(4) is a constant endomorphism in interval , and an identity in interval .(5) is a constant endomorphism in interval , an identity in interval and a constant endomorphism in interval .

Proof. Let . Since is not a jump point, there are two possibilities: or . In the first case the equality is impossible; see Proposition 1. So, either and is the next jump point or . From these reasonings, it follows that is a constant endomorphism in interval . When for point , there are three possibilities. If , then is the next jump point and is an identity in the interval between the considered jump points. If , by the previous reasonings, we find that is an identity in interval and a constant endomorphism in the second interval. Let . Now if for any , it follows that . Then is an identity in the whole interval. If for some we have , then is an identity in interval and a constant endomorphism in interval .
Let . Since is an idempotent, it follows that ; that is is a constant endomorphism in interval . If then is a constant endomorphism in the whole interval. Let , and for any , where , we have . So, is a constant endomorphism in interval and an identity in interval . In the end, if there is some , , such that , then is a constant endomorphism in interval , an identity in interval , and a constant endomorphism in interval .

It is straightforward to show that if one of the conditions (1)–(5) of Lemma 23 holds for endomorphism , then is an idempotent.

From Lemma 23 it follows that the graph of the arbitrary idempotent endomorphism has the shape displayed on Figure 1. Note that each of the three segments of this graph can have length zero.

120231.fig.001
Figure 1

Let and be consecutive jump points of the idempotent . Then the graph of is a particular case of those displayed in Figure 1 containing one point , where .

Lemma 24. Let and be idempotent endomorphisms of with the same jump points . Then is also an idempotent endomorphism with the same jump points.

Proof. First we will prove that are jump points of endomorphism . Let be any common jump point of and . If is also a fixed point of and , that is, both idempotents satisfied the inequalities and , and , then and . When for it follows that and or for it follows that and , then and .
Now we will prove that sum is an idempotent endomorphism. Let us, like in Lemma 23, fix two nonconsecutive jump points and of idempotents and and the interval .
When the idempotent satisfies some the of conditions (1)–(5) of Lemma 23, we denote this by .
When satisfies and satisfies , we denote this by . Let, in this case, be equal to constant in interval , and is consecutively equal to constant , identity and constant . If or , then . If , then satisfy condition . This reasoning we denote by   or  .
The verification of all fifteen possibilities is easy:
Thus we prove that the sum of two idempotent endomorphisms in interval is also an idempotent in this interval. So, it follows that is an idempotent endomorphism in interval . For each of idempotents and satisfies one of conditions (1)–(5) of Lemma 23. So, from the previous reasonings it follows that sum is an idempotent endomorphism in . In a similar way we show that is an idempotent endomorphism in . Hence, is an idempotent endomorphism in the whole chain .

Lemma 25. Let and be idempotent endomorphisms of with the same jump points . Then is also an idempotent endomorphism with the same jump points.

Proof. First we will prove that are the jump points of endomorphism . Let be any common jump point of and . Let be also a fixed point of or of ; that is, and or and . Then it follows that in all cases and . Let be not a fixed point of both idempotents; that is, and and also and . At last, we obtain that and .
Now we will prove that is an idempotent endomorphism. Like in the proof of the previous lemma, we fix two nonconsecutive jump points and of idempotents and and interval .
Using the notations from the proof of Lemma 24 we easily verify all twenty-five possibilities:
Thus we prove that the product of both idempotent endomorphisms in interval is also an idempotent in this interval. It easily implies that is an idempotent endomorphism in the whole interval . In interval each one of the idempotents and satisfies one of the conditions (1)–(5), of Lemma 23. So, from the previous reasonings it follows that the product is an idempotent endomorphism in . In a similar way we show that is an idempotent endomorphism in . Hence, is an idempotent endomorphism in the whole .

Immediately from Lemmas 24 and 25 follows Theorem 26.

Theorem 26. The set of the idempotent endomorphisms of with the same jump points is a subsemiring of .

From Lemmas 24 and 25, and Figure 1 it is easy to prove the following.

Proposition 27. The set of the idempotent endomorphisms of without jump points is a subsemiring of of order .

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