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ISRN Biochemistry
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 692190, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/692190
Review Article

Constrained Peptides as Miniature Protein Structures

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and BioFrontiers Institute, University of Colorado at Boulder, 596 University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309-0596, USA

Received 29 July 2012; Accepted 3 September 2012

Academic Editors: D. Civitareale, O. Hino, and D. Hoja-Lukowicz

Copyright © 2012 Hang Yin. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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