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ISRN Biochemistry
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 198065, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/198065
Research Article

Biochemical Studies on Methylglyoxal-Mediated Glycated Histones: Implications for Presence of Serum Antibodies against the Glycated Histones in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

1Department of Biochemistry, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005, India
2Department of Biochemistry, Universal College of Medical Sciences, Paklihawa Campus, Bhairawaha, Nepal

Received 17 June 2013; Accepted 17 July 2013

Academic Editors: K.-i. Isobe and J. Neira

Copyright © 2013 Nadeem A. Ansari and Debabrata Dash. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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