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ISRN Cell Biology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 714192, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/714192
Review Article

Peroxisome Dynamics: Molecular Players, Mechanisms, and (Dys)functions

Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, KU Leuven, Herestraat 49, P.O. Box 601, 3000 Leuven, Belgium

Received 25 September 2012; Accepted 17 October 2012

Academic Editors: T. Neufeld, D. A. Skoufias, and C. C. Uphoff

Copyright © 2012 Marc Fransen. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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