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ISRN Cell Biology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 265182, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/265182
Research Article

Identification of PDZ Domain Containing Proteins Interacting with 1.2 and PMCA4b

1Institute of Physiology, University of Wuerzburg, Roentgenring 9, 97070 Wuerzburg, Germany
2Eye Clinic, University of Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg, Germany
3Department of Medicine I, University of Wuerzburg, Oberduerrbacherstraße 4, 97080 Wuerzburg, Germany

Received 30 November 2012; Accepted 25 December 2012

Academic Editors: T. Yazawa, N. Zambrano, and Y. Zhang

Copyright © 2013 Doreen Korb et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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