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ISRN Dentistry
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 684607, 24 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/684607
Review Article

Dental Enamel Development: Proteinases and Their Enamel Matrix Substrates

Harvard School of Dental Medicine & Chair, Department of Mineralized Tissue Biology, The Forsyth Institute, 245 First Street, Cambridge MA 02142, USA

Received 27 June 2013; Accepted 15 July 2013

Academic Editors: A. Jäger and J. H. Jeng

Copyright © 2013 John D. Bartlett. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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