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ISRN Dermatology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 642157, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/642157
Research Article

Nevus Senescence

1Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, USA
2Melanoma Program, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33136, USA
3Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL 33136, USA

Received 4 April 2011; Accepted 30 April 2011

Academic Editors: M. Alaibac, S.-C. Chao, and N. Darwiche

Copyright © 2011 Andrew L. Ross et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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