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ISRN Dermatology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 941465, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/941465
Research Article

VEGF Is Involved in the Increase of Dermal Microvascular Permeability Induced by Tryptase

1Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Fudan University Shanghai Medical College, Shanghai 200032, China
2Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Jiaotong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai 200032, China

Received 5 February 2012; Accepted 13 March 2012

Academic Editors: E. Pasmatzi and A. Zalewska

Copyright © 2012 Qianming Bai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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