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ISRN Forestry
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 490461, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/490461
Research Article

Variation in Woody Species Abundance and Distribution in and around Kibale National Park, Uganda

1School of Forestry, Environmental and Geographical Sciences, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7062, Kampala, Uganda
2National Environment Management Authority, P.O. Box 22255, Kampala, Uganda
3Department of Natural Resources, Kaliro District Local Government, P.O. Box 56, Kaliro, Uganda

Received 14 April 2012; Accepted 6 June 2012

Academic Editors: M. Kitahara, G. Martinez Pastur, and F.-R. Meng

Copyright © 2012 Paul Okiror et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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