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ISRN Inflammation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 379040, 22 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/379040
Review Article

Pentraxins: Structure, Function, and Role in Inflammation

1The Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Research Service 151, 1501 San Pedro SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, The University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, NM 87108, USA

Received 30 July 2013; Accepted 19 August 2013

Academic Editors: S. Brugaletta, T. Pessi, and M. Rattazzi

Copyright © 2013 Terry W. Du Clos. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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