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ISRN Microbiology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 659754, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/659754
Research Article

Integument Mycobiota of Wild European Hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) from Catalonia, Spain

1Centre de Fauna Salvatge de Torreferrussa, Catalan Wildlife Service, Forestal Catalana, 08130 Santa Perpètua de la Mogoda, Spain
2Departament de Sanitat i d'Anatomia Animals, Facultat de Veterinaria, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain
3Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal (CReSA), UAB-IRTA, Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Spain

Received 9 July 2012; Accepted 26 August 2012

Academic Editors: E. Jumas-Bilak and G. Koraimann

Copyright © 2012 R. A. Molina-López et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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