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ISRN Neuroscience
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 261364, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/261364
Review Article

The Mind-Brain Relationship as a Mathematical Problem

Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study, George Mason University, Fairfax, 22030-4444 VA, USA

Received 11 February 2013; Accepted 7 March 2013

Academic Editors: J. A. Hinojosa and S. Rampp

Copyright © 2013 Giorgio A. Ascoli. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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