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ISRN Nursing
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 748238, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/748238
Review Article

Using a Socioecological Framework to Understand the Career Choices of Single- and Double-Degree Nursing Students and Double-Degree Graduates

1School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, NSW 2258, Australia
2School of Teacher Education, Charles Sturt University, Bathurst, NSW 2795, Australia

Received 31 March 2012; Accepted 4 June 2012

Academic Editors: C. Huston, J. S. Lymn, and B. Mandleco

Copyright © 2012 Noelene Hickey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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