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ISRN Obesity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 435027, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/435027
Review Article

From Passive Overeating to “Food Addiction”: A Spectrum of Compulsion and Severity

Kinesiology & Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, York University, 343 Bethune College, 4700 Keele Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3

Received 20 March 2013; Accepted 16 April 2013

Academic Editors: H. Gordish-Dressman, E. K. Naderali, S. J. Pintauro, S. Straube, S. Weitzman, and J. Zempleni

Copyright © 2013 Caroline Davis. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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