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ISRN Oncology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 137289, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/137289
Review Article

Oxidative Stress and Lipid Peroxidation Products in Cancer Progression and Therapy

Department of Medicine and Experimental Oncology, University of Turin, Corso Raffaello 30, 10125 Torino, Italy

Received 24 July 2012; Accepted 28 August 2012

Academic Editors: P. Balaram, B. Fang, N. Fujimoto, and O. Hansen

Copyright © 2012 Giuseppina Barrera. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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