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ISRN Oncology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 492578, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/492578
Clinical Study

Detection of PIK3CA Mutations in Breast Cancer Bone Metastases

1Centre for Cancer Therapeutics, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L6
2Department of Pathology, Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada K1H 8L6
3Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5
4Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5

Received 28 May 2012; Accepted 25 June 2012

Academic Editors: G. E. Lind, V. Lorusso, and R. Nahta

Copyright © 2012 Manijeh Daneshmand et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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