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ISRN Oncology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 305371, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/305371
Review Article

Deregulations in the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-9-Related Pathway in Cancer: Implications for Drug Discovery and Development

College of Science and Technology, Department of Biology, Temple University, Bio Life Science Building, Suite 456, 1900 North 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA

Received 23 April 2013; Accepted 19 May 2013

Academic Editors: L. Mutti and S. Patel

Copyright © 2013 Gaetano Romano. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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