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ISRN Oncology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 371854, 25 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/371854
Review Article

Targeting of the Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily for Cancer Immunotherapy

Department of Surgery, Translational Surgical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, 9713GZ Groningen, The Netherlands

Received 10 April 2013; Accepted 11 May 2013

Academic Editors: H. Al-Ali, J. Bentel, D. Canuti, L. Mutti, and R. V. Sionov

Copyright © 2013 Edwin Bremer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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