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ISRN Oncology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 465916, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/465916
Review Article

UGT2B17 Polymorphism and Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

1Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tong Ji Medical College, 13 Hang Kong Road, Wuhan 430030, China
2Department of Ophthalmology, Tong Ji Medical College, 13 Hang Kong Road, Wuhan 430030, China
3Department of Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health, Tong Ji Medical College, 13 Hang Kong Road, Wuhan 430030, China
4Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tong Ji Medical College, 13 Hang Kong Road, Wuhan 430030, China

Received 18 June 2013; Accepted 4 August 2013

Academic Editors: J. Bentel, G. Metro, C. A. Perez, and L.-M. Sun

Copyright © 2013 Marce-Amara Kpoghomou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. Recent studies on the association between uridine diphosphosglucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) 2B17 polymorphism and risk of prostate cancer (PCa) showed inconclusive results. To clarify this possible association, we conducted a meta-analysis of published studies. Methods. We searched the published literature from PubMed, Embase, Google Scholar, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). According to our inclusion criteria, studies that observed the association between UGT2B17 polymorphism and PCa risk were included. The principal outcome measure was the adjusted odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for the risk of PCa associated with UGT2B17 polymorphism. Results. A total of 6 studies with 7,029 subjects (3,839 cases and 3,190 controls) were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Overall, there was a significant association between UGT2B17 polymorphism and increased risk of prostate cancer ( , 95% CI 1.14–2.64, ). Similar results were found in the subgroup analyses by ethnicity and types of controls. Conclusion. This meta-analysis demonstrates that UGT2B17 polymorphism is associated with prostate cancer susceptibility, and it contributes to the increased risk of prostate cancer.