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ISRN Oncology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 584672, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/584672
Clinical Study

Impact of Real-Time Elastography versus Systematic Prostate Biopsy Method on Cancer Detection Rate in Men with a Serum Prostate-Specific Antigen between 2.5 and 10 ng/mL

1Department of Urology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano, 20089 Milan, Italy
2Service of Echography, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano, 20089 Milan, Italy
3Department of Pathology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano, 20089 Milan, Italy
4Service of Statistics, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano, 20089 Milan, Italy
5Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano, 20089 Milan, Italy

Received 29 November 2012; Accepted 24 December 2012

Academic Editors: L.-M. Sun and K. van Golen

Copyright © 2013 Gianluigi Taverna et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The actual gold standard for the diagnosis of prostate cancer includes the serum prostate-specific antigen, the digital rectal examination, and the ultrasound-guided systematic prostate biopsy sampling. In the last years, the real-time elastography has been introduced as an imaging technique to increase the detection rate of prostate cancer and simultaneously reduce the number of biopsies sampled for a single patient. Here, we evaluated a consecutive series of 102 patients with negative digital-rectal examination and transrectal ultrasound, and prostate-specific antigen value ranging between 2.5 ng/mL and 10 ng/mL, in order to assess the impact of real-time elastography versus the systematic biopsy on the detection of prostate cancer. We found that only 1 out of 102 patients resulted true positive for prostate cancer when analysed with real-time elastography. In the other 6 cases, real-time elastography evidenced areas positive for prostate cancer, although additional neoplastic foci were found using systematic biopsy sampling in areas evidenced by real-time elastography as negative. Although additional studies are necessary for evaluating the effectiveness of this imaging technique, the present study indicates that the limited accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity do not justify the routine application of real-time elastography in prostate cancer detection.