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ISRN Oncology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 693920, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/693920
Review Article

Evolving Concepts: How Diet and the Intestinal Microbiome Act as Modulators of Breast Malignancy

1Monter Cancer Center, Don Monti Division of Oncology and Division of Hematology, Hofstra North Shore Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, 450 Lakeville Road, Lake Success, NY 11042, USA
2Hofstra North Shore Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, North Shore University Hospital, 300 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA
3Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Robert S. Boas Center for Genomics and Human Genetics and Elmezzi Graduate School of Molecular Medicine, Hofstra North Shore Long Island Jewish School of Medicine, 350 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA
4Population Health-Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine and North Shore/LIJ Health System, 175 Community Drive, Room 203, Great Neck, NY 11021, USA

Received 30 July 2013; Accepted 25 August 2013

Academic Editors: B. B. Patel and D. Peng

Copyright © 2013 Iuliana Shapira et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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