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ISRN Oncology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 810573, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/810573
Research Article

Accuracy of Self-Reported Screening Mammography Use: Examining Recall among Female Relatives from the Ontario Site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry

1Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 2L7
2Division of Epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 3M7
3Maternal-Infant Care Research Centre, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X6
4Division of Biostatistics, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 3M7
5Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5
6School of Kinesiology and Health Science, Faculty of Health, York University, Toronto, ON, Canada M3J 1P3
7Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 1A8

Received 11 June 2013; Accepted 14 July 2013

Academic Editors: S. Chen, T. Kozu, Y. Yamamoto, and T. Yokoe

Copyright © 2013 Meghan J. Walker et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Evidence of the accuracy of self-reported mammography use among women with familial breast cancer risk is limited. This study examined the accuracy of self-reported screening mammography dates in a cohort of 1,114 female relatives of breast cancer cases, aged 26 to 73 from the Ontario site of the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Self-reported dates were compared to dates abstracted from imaging reports. Associations between inaccurate recall and subject characteristics were assessed using multinomial regression. Almost all women (95.2% at baseline, 98.5% at year 1, 99.8% at year 2) accurately reported their mammogram use within the previous 12 months. Women at low familial risk (OR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.00–3.13), who reported 1 or fewer annual visits to a health professional (OR = 1.97, 95% CI: 1.15, 3.39), exhibited a lower perceived breast cancer risk (OR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.15, 3.15), and reported a mammogram date more than 12 months previous (OR = 5.22, 95% CI: 3.10, 8.80), were significantly more likely to inaccurately recall their mammogram date. Women with varying levels of familial risk are accurate reporters of their mammogram use. These results present the first evidence of self-reported mammography recall accuracy among women with varying levels of familial risk.