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ISRN Oncology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 840964, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/840964
Research Article

Relationship between Metabolic Syndrome and History of Cervical Cancer among a US National Population

1Department of Family and Community Medicine, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 9849 Kenworthy Street, El Paso. TX 79924, USA
2Department of Biostatistics, Paul L. Foster School of Medicine, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, 9849 Kenworthy Street, El Paso. TX 79924, USA

Received 21 December 2012; Accepted 10 January 2013

Academic Editors: R.-J. Bensadoun, A. Celetti, A. M. Garcia-Lora, and G. Gatti

Copyright © 2013 Eribeth K. Penaranda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The metabolic changes present in the metabolic syndrome (MetS) have been associated with increased risk of pancreatic and colon cancers; however, there is little information about the association between MetS and cervical cancer risk. We performed a case-control study using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) between 1999–2010. We identified women 21 years of age and older, of which an estimated 585,924 (2.3% of the sample) self-reported a history of cervical cancer (cases). About half (48.6%) of cases and 33.2% of controls met criteria for MetS. Logistic regression analysis showed increased odds of history of cervical cancer among women with MetS ( ; 95% CI 1.06, 3.42; value ≤ 0.05) for the risk of history of cervical cancer among women with MetS while adjusting for other known risk factors (high number of lifetime sexual partners, multiparty, history of hormonal contraceptive use, and history of smoking) ( ; 95% CI 1.02, 3.26; value ≤ 0.05). In this US surveyed population we found increased odds of history of cervical cancer among subjects with MetS.