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ISRN Otolaryngology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 708974, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/708974
Review Article

Hypoxia in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Department of Surgery, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, 21 Sassoon Road, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong

Received 31 August 2012; Accepted 23 September 2012

Academic Editors: M. V. Nestor and M. B. Paiva

Copyright © 2012 John Zenghong Li et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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