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ISRN Pathology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 930729, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/930729
Review Article

Glycogen as a Putative Target for Diagnosis and Therapy in Brain Pathologies

Neurobioloy Laboratory, University of Orléans, Chartres Street, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2, France

Received 20 May 2011; Accepted 19 June 2011

Academic Editors: R. Pluta and F. J. Rodriguez

Copyright © 2011 Jean-François Cloix and Tobias Hévor. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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