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ISRN Pharmacology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 187208, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/187208
Research Article

The Effect of Tempol Administration on the Aortic Contractile Responses in Rat Preeclampsia Model

1Department of Pharmacology, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz 71348-53185, Iran
2Herbal Medicine Research Center, School of Medicine, Yasouj University of Medical Sciences, Yasouj, Iran
3Medicinal and Natural Products Chemistry Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

Received 7 April 2012; Accepted 17 July 2012

Academic Editors: G. Biala, M. Brunner, and K. Cimanga

Copyright © 2012 Mohammad Sharif Talebianpoor and Hossein Mirkhani. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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