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ISRN Veterinary Science
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 495830, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/495830
Review Article

Felid Herpesvirus Type 1 Infection in Cats: A Natural Host Model for Alphaherpesvirus Pathogenesis

Departments of Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA

Received 11 September 2012; Accepted 20 October 2012

Academic Editors: M. H. Kogut, V. Nair, and S. Takai

Copyright © 2012 Roger Maes. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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