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ISRN Veterinary Science
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 704825, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/704825
Review Article

Trace Minerals and Livestock: Not Too Much Not Too Little

Department of Animal Pathology, Veterinary Faculty, 27002 Lugo, Spain

Received 9 October 2012; Accepted 31 October 2012

Academic Editors: Ø. Bergh, P. Butaye, M. H. Kogut, and S. Whisnant

Copyright © 2012 Marta López-Alonso. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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