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ISRN Allergy
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 405813, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/405813
Research Article

Th2 Cytokine Levels Distort the Association of IL-10 and IFN- 𝛾 with Allergic Phenotypes

1School of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Western Australia, GPO Box D184, Perth, WA 6840, Australia
2Telethon Institute for Child Health Research and UWA Centre for Child Health Research, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Western Australia, GPO Box D184, Perth, WA 6840, Australia

Received 3 November 2011; Accepted 28 November 2011

Academic Editors: D. C. Cara and B. F. Gibbs

Copyright © 2011 Guicheng Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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