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ISRN Immunology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 426095, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2011/426095
Review Article

PICOT: A Multidomain Protein with Multiple Functions

The Shraga Segal Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences and the Cancer Research Center, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel

Received 3 August 2011; Accepted 18 August 2011

Academic Editors: S.-I. Fujii, D. L. Jankovic, and P. Kisielow

Copyright © 2011 Anna Keselman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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