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ISRN Emergency Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 254530, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/254530
Research Article

Patient Use of Tablet Computers to Facilitate Emergency Department Pain Assessment and Documentation

1Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Community Medicine, University of Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK 74104, USA
2Emergency Department, Hillcrest Medical Center, Tulsa, OK 74104, USA

Received 17 August 2012; Accepted 19 September 2012

Academic Editors: A. Eisenman and G. Volpicelli

Copyright © 2012 Annette O. Arthur et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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