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ISRN Education
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 350713, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/350713
Research Article

Students' Beliefs about Willingness to Access Complementary and Alternative Therapies (CAT) Training for Future Integration into Psychology Practice

1School of Public Health, Queensland University of Technology, Victoria Park Road Kelvin Grove, Kelvin Grove, QLD 4059, Australia
2School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University, Messines Ridge Road, MT Gravatt, QLD 4122, Australia
3School of Psychology and Counselling, Queensland University of Technology, Victoria Park Road Kelvin Grove, Kelvin Grove, QLD 4059, Australia

Received 18 March 2012; Accepted 2 May 2012

Academic Editors: R. Mamlok-Naaman, M. Martin, and M. Platsidou

Copyright © 2012 Lee-Ann M. Wilson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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