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ISRN Immunology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 354365, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/354365
Review Article

An Emerging Role for Serine Protease Inhibitors in T Lymphocyte Immunity and Beyond

Section of Immunobiology, Division of Immunology and Inflammation, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, Room 258, Exhibition Road, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, UK

Received 29 July 2012; Accepted 6 September 2012

Academic Editors: G. Chaouat, P. Kisielow, A. Sundstedt, and A. Vicente

Copyright © 2012 Philip G. Ashton-Rickardt. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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