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ISRN Nursing
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 608039, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.5402/2012/608039
Research Article

Cancer-Specific Stress and Mood Disturbance: Implications for Symptom Perception, Quality of Life, and Immune Response in Women Shortly after Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

1University of Texas School of Nursing at Houston, 6901 Bertner Avenue, CNR No. 536, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, 3500 Victoria Street, VB 415, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA
3UAB Hospital, 184-A Russel Wing, 1813 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35249, USA

Received 16 October 2012; Accepted 28 November 2012

Academic Editors: S. McClement and A. Williams

Copyright © 2012 Duck-Hee Kang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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